Tuesday, April 18, 2017

On Being Awarded my Microsoft MVP on the Data Platform

The email came on Saturday, April 1st.  It was already a crazy day, with my daughter competing in regionals, several hours away that evening.  Things were a bit of a whirlwind that morning getting her to dress rehearsal in full hair & makeup, costume ready to go and packing bags for our over night stay.  I'm having a very late, very rushed lunch with my boyfriend as 3 MVP calendar invites show up in my inbox.  There's been some mistake, I think.  It is April Fool's Day after all. I wasn't awarded an MVP with this latest round.  Was I?  

Time to check the Social & Promotional folders on my Gmail. And there it is



Congratulations 2017 Microsoft MVP!


I'm actually at a loss for words for a couple of minutes.  I place my phone, face down on the table and quietly say "I've been awarded the MVP.  I can think of so many other people that are more deserving."  To be considered among such company is incredibly humbling.  I'm immediately aware of the responsibility now upon my shoulders.   

So what is an MVP & how did I become one?

According to Microsoft, this award is given to exceptional community leaders who share their remarkable passion, real-world knowledge and technical expertise with other through a demonstration of exemplary commitment.  I suppose I do that.  I'm very active with my local user group and I organize SQL Saturday Atlanta (register or submit NOW!).  I speak at SQL Saturdays all across the US every year.  I'm an Idera ACE for 2017 where they encourage me to blog, answer questions in their forums, host #SQLChat and present webinars for them.  I'm co-leader of the PASS Women in Technology Virtual Chapter and host 15+ webinars a year where women speak on technical topics and highlight women technical speakers weekly as they're speaking at different events, presenting webinars or Pre Cons.  I mentor other women to GET OUT THERE and speak.  

Know someone else that should be?

Do you know someone that does all of this and probably more?  If so, I encourage you to NOMINATE that person to be a Microsoft MVP as well.  It applies for women in business and the same holds true for being an MVP.  Once you make it through the door, it's your responsibility to drag someone along with you.  I've already nominated someone that I felt was truly deserving of the award.  

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